LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION – HOW MUCH DOES IT COST?

Grant of Letters of Administration is a court document granted by the Family Court issued to the person (usually the closest next of kin) who will administer the estate of someone who dies without a will

fees for letter of administration

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Grant of Letters of Administration – How much does it cost?

At PKWA Law, our legal fees for an application for a Grant of Letters of Administration cost just $1,500 (without GST and disbursements).

How much are the court fees and disbursements? The court fees range from about $300 to about $600.

For assets below $5 million, the filing fees and disbursements for Grant of Letters of Administration are as follows: .

Court Filing Fees for Letters of Administration

  1. Probate Search – $50.00
  2. Oath Fees – $240.00
  3. Statement – $5.60
  4. Ex-parte Originating Summons –  $87.20
  5. Death Certificate –  $4.80
  6. Consent of Co-Administrator – $31.20
  7. Schedule of Assets – $5.60
  8. Supporting Affidavit – $12.80
  9. Affidavit – $17.20
  10. Summons for Dispensation of Sureties – $27.20
  11. Order of Court – $55.60
  12. Administrative Bond – $105.60
  13. Request for Extraction of Grant – $42.20

Total: S$685 (approximate)

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When do you need a Grant of Letter of Administration?

Now that you understand that applying for a Grant of Letter of Administration is very affordable, let’s discuss when you might need a Letter of Administration.

You will need Letters of Administration when someone with assets passes away without a Will.

When a person dies, someone needs to collect all his assets and distribute them to the beneficiaries. The probate lawyer will apply to court to get you a Grant of Probate (where the person dies with a will) or Letters of Administration (where the person dies without a will) to enable the rightful person to collect the deceased’s assets and to distribute them in accordance with the will or in accordance with the Intestate Succession Act.

Letters of Administration are thus a court document granted by the Family Court issued to the person (usually the closest next of kin) who will administer the estate of someone who dies without a will.   The rules governing Letters of Administration are found in the Probate and Administration Act and the Intestate Succession Act.

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 Who can apply for Letters of Administration?

If the person dies without a will, the law prescribes a list of persons who can apply for Letters of Administration.  The list of persons are in order of priority.  The persons who can apply for Letters of Administration (in order of priority) are as follows:

  1. the spouse;
  2. the children of the deceased;
  3. the parents;
  4. brothers and sisters;
  5. nephews and nieces;
  6. grandparents; and
  7. uncles and aunts.

Hence, the spouse gets the first priority to be the person applying for Letters of Administration.   Sometimes, the person with the priority may not want to administer the estate for the deceased.  As an illustration, the spouse may be overseas or ill, and prefers the children to be applying for Letters of Administration.  In such an instance, the spouse can “renounce” the right to be the administrator in favour of one of the children.

At least two administrators  must be appointed if one or more beneficiaries of the estate is below 21 years of age.

Naturally, bankrupts and infants cannot be appointed as administrators.

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How are assets distributed under a Letter of Administration?

When a person passes away and leaves behind a will, the distribution of the assets will be in accordance with the will.  However, where the person did not leave behind a will, the law under section 7 of the Intestate Succession Act is that the assets must be distributed in the following manner:

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If the deceased person has only a spouse (but no children, no parents)

The spouse gets everything.

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If the deceased person has a spouse and children

The spouse will get half the assets and the children will get the other half in equal proportions.

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If  the person has only children (but no spouse)

The children get everything in equal shares.

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If the person has a spouse and parents (but no children)

The spouse gets half and the parents get the other half in equal shares.

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If the person has only parents (but no spouse and no children)

The parents get everything in equal shares.

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If the person has only brothers and sisters (but no spouse, no children and no parents)

The brothers and sisters (or children of the deceased brother or sister) get everything in equal shares.

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If the person has only grandparents (but no spouse, children, parents, brothers and sisters or children of deceased brother and sister)

The grandparents get everything in equal shares.

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If the person has only have uncles and aunts (but no spouse, children, parents, brothers and sisters or children of deceased brother and sister and no grandparents)

The uncles and aunts take everything in equal shares.

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If there are no living relatives as above

The government takes everything.

The actual legal wording from the Intestate Succession Act is below:

Rule 1
   If an intestate dies leaving a surviving spouse, no issue and no parent, the spouse shall be entitled to the whole of the estate.
Rule 2
   If an intestate dies leaving a surviving spouse and issue, the spouse shall be entitled to one-half of the estate.
Rule 3
   Subject to the rights of the surviving spouse, if any, the estate (both as to the undistributed portion and the reversionary interest) of an intestate who leaves issue shall be distributed by equal portions per stirpes to and amongst the children of the person dying intestate and such persons as legally represent those children, in case any of those children be then dead.
   Proviso No. (1) — The persons who legally represent the children of an intestate are their descendants and not their next‑of‑kin.
   Proviso No. (2) — Descendants of the intestate to the remotest degree stand in the place of their parent or other ancestor, and take according to their stocks the share which he or she would have taken.
Rule 4
If an intestate dies leaving a surviving spouse and no issue but a parent or parents, the spouse shall be entitled to one-half of the estate and the parent or parents to the other half of the estate.
Rule 5
   If there are no descendants, the parent or parents of the intestate shall take the estate, in equal portions if there be 2 parents, subject to the rights of the surviving spouse (if any) as provided in rule 4.
Rule 6
   If there are no surviving spouse, descendants or parents, the brothers and sisters and children of deceased brothers or sisters of the intestate shall share the estate in equal portions between the brothers and sisters and the children of any deceased brother or sister shall take according to their stocks the share which the deceased brother or sister would have taken.
Rule 7
   If there are no surviving spouse, descendants, parents, brothers and sisters or children of such brothers and sisters but grandparents of the intestate, the grandparents shall take the whole of the estate in equal portions.
Rule 8
   If there are no surviving spouse, descendants, parents, brothers and sisters or their children or grandparents but uncles and aunts of the intestate, the uncles and aunts shall take the whole of the estate in equal portions.
Rule 9
   In default of distribution under rules 1 to 8, the Government shall be entitled to the whole of the estate.

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LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION

PKWA LAW’S FEES FOR LETTER OF ADMINISTRATION – $1,500

PROBATE AND LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION FEE.

ABOUT PKWA PROBATE LAW

PROBATE LAWYERS IN SINGAPORE

At PKWA Law, our team of Family Lawyers are consistently named as leading Singapore family lawyers by respected independent legal publications such as Asian Legal Business, Singapore Business Review, Global Law Experts and Doyle’s Guide to Singapore Family Lawyers.  If you are applying for a Letter of Administration, we can assist you with fees starting from $1,500.

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RELATED ARTICLES:

Grant of Probate and Letters of Administration 

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